FOR THE GOOD TIMES – Reggae Albums of 1974

Whereas the Soul History section of the book recommends 100 albums from each year of the early Seventies, the Reggae History element is limited to just 50 long-playing vinyl records. The reasons for this are twofold: in some years there weren’t as many as 100 even released in the UK but moreso, the quality of a number of reggae albums was questionable. Even as it stands, some of the albums listed may only be one or two-track LPs. Reggae has always been a market dominated by the ‘single’ format – whether on 7-inch, or from 1977 on 12-inch. Reggae’s initial forays into the LP format during the Sixties had tended to be a proliferation of compilation albums and hit collections. This trend began to change in the early Seventies as reggae companies began to experiment with more carefully conceived albums by reggae bands, groups and singers. It also introduced the ‘dub’ album to the world which significantly increased the popularity of the format in reggae circles and beyond. We have already inspected the Top 100 Soul Albums of 1974 – this week we focus on the Top 50 Reggae Albums of 1974. These albums sold almost exclusively in specialist black music shops as many were released on local independent reggae labels. Trojan Records was the major company for reggae at the time (of the 50, over half are on Trojan or associated labels Horse and Attack). These tended to have better national distrubution so made these records more accessible. Though Continue reading

1976 – UK Soul Number Ones

The first UK Soul Singles chart was published in the launch issue of Black Echoes on January 30th 1976. It was the first of the only weekly soul charts published in the UK at the time. Black Music published a soul singles chart monthly whilst Blues & Soul published a fortnightly chart. Not surprisingly, the Motown label dominated the chart during its first year – notching up 17 hits, including two No.1 smashes. In 1976, 204 titles entered the chart of which 126 reached the Top 10. 146 separate acts made the charts on 62 different record labels – including two US imports. There were 83 groups which made the chart – the most successful of which were War and The Stylistics who both had four hits that year. Of the 44 male acts which made the chart, Barry White was the only one to have four hits, the most of all the male artists. Only 18 female singers reached the chart in 1976 – Diana Ross reigning supreme with four hits for Motown. The following is a breakdown of just 20 records that reached the coveted No.1 slot. Love Machine | The Miracles | Tamla Motown 1 wk In 1975, prior to this record’s release in November, the only single released by The Miracles that year was a UK-only issue cover of an old Brotherhood Of Man hit called ‘Where Are You Going To My Love’. It failed to make the pop charts and only die-hard soul fans seemed Continue reading