1977 – UK Soul Number Ones

The first issue of Black Echoes in 1977 was dated January 1st. In the Soul Singles chart, KC & The Sunshine Band were knocked off their Christmas top-spot by a group who had already had a few hits on the chart, including a No.1. The year saw a good mixture of bands, soloists, vocal groups and instrumentalists all make their way to the top of the chart. The chart-toppers were dominated by American acts – but a British band and a trio of French disco experimentalists broke through. Unusually, all the weeks at No.1 by all of the acts were consecutive. There were 22 records in all. Spin ’em: CAR WASH | Rose Royce | MCA 7 wks As a precursor to my personal insight on this particular single, please see the 2nd blog – 1976 Soul Number Ones. It gives you the initial lowdown on this essential disco cut. Suffice to say, this was the first No.1 soul single of ’77 and what a scorcher! Topping the charts for an impressive 7 weeks, it was the title-track to a comedy film starring Richard Pryor. Producer Norman Whitfield created the soundtrack which strongly featured the group. With its distinctive opening handclaps, the song (sung with soulful energy by lead vocalist Gwen Dickey) captured the imagination of everyone – topping the US pop charts along the way and reaching the Top 10 in the UK. This was the group’s second UK Soul Singles No.1 hit. DON’T LEAVE ME THIS WAY | Continue reading

POWER OF SOUL – Soul Albums of 1974

After last week’s look at some soul hits from 1962, it’s time to focus on some of the key soul albums from 1974. This extract forms a part of the History section of Celebrate Good Times. Again, 100 have been selected – with a Top 25 chosen for special attention and merit. In the UK during the mid 70s, the demand for soul albums was increasing. Of course, in the US there were many independently released records which never gained a UK issue – and were not even imported at the time. However, the records listed below are selected from the few hundred soul albums that were released by the major record companies of the day. Specialist publications such as Blues And Soul and Black Music kept soul fans reliably informed of what was newly available. Because the singles market was so strong, an album containing a few singles was financially more attractive than forking out money for a clutch of 45s. At this time, the popular labels like Tamla Motown, Atlantic and Stax were still going strong. Of course, as with all such lists, the selections provide a very personal handpicked overview of the year – but they do reflect what I was listening to and buying at the time, in addition to those other albums I picked up later along the way on many, many cratedigging hunts. Without a doubt, the Top 5 are the albums I was mad about at the time and still am now. George Continue reading

1976 – UK Soul Number Ones

The first UK Soul Singles chart was published in the launch issue of Black Echoes on January 30th 1976. It was the first of the only weekly soul charts published in the UK at the time. Black Music published a soul singles chart monthly whilst Blues & Soul published a fortnightly chart. Not surprisingly, the Motown label dominated the chart during its first year – notching up 17 hits, including two No.1 smashes. In 1976, 204 titles entered the chart of which 126 reached the Top 10. 146 separate acts made the charts on 62 different record labels – including two US imports. There were 83 groups which made the chart – the most successful of which were War and The Stylistics who both had four hits that year. Of the 44 male acts which made the chart, Barry White was the only one to have four hits, the most of all the male artists. Only 18 female singers reached the chart in 1976 – Diana Ross reigning supreme with four hits for Motown. The following is a breakdown of just 20 records that reached the coveted No.1 slot. Love Machine | The Miracles | Tamla Motown 1 wk In 1975, prior to this record’s release in November, the only single released by The Miracles that year was a UK-only issue cover of an old Brotherhood Of Man hit called ‘Where Are You Going To My Love’. It failed to make the pop charts and only die-hard soul fans seemed Continue reading