FOR THE GOOD TIMES – Reggae Albums of 1974

Whereas the Soul History section of the book recommends 100 albums from each year of the early Seventies, the Reggae History element is limited to just 50 long-playing vinyl records. The reasons for this are twofold: in some years there weren’t as many as 100 even released in the UK but moreso, the quality of a number of reggae albums was questionable. Even as it stands, some of the albums listed may only be one or two-track LPs. Reggae has always been a market dominated by the ‘single’ format – whether on 7-inch, or from 1977 on 12-inch. Reggae’s initial forays into the LP format during the Sixties had tended to be a proliferation of compilation albums and hit collections. This trend began to change in the early Seventies as reggae companies began to experiment with more carefully conceived albums by reggae bands, groups and singers. It also introduced the ‘dub’ album to the world which significantly increased the popularity of the format in reggae circles and beyond. We have already inspected the Top 100 Soul Albums of 1974 – this week we focus on the Top 50 Reggae Albums of 1974. These albums sold almost exclusively in specialist black music shops as many were released on local independent reggae labels. Trojan Records was the major company for reggae at the time (of the 50, over half are on Trojan or associated labels Horse and Attack). These tended to have better national distrubution so made these records more accessible. Though Continue reading

DREAD MOOD – Reggae Singles of 1975

Celebrate Good Times not only microscopically inspects the chart positions of thousands of reggae and soul albums and singles over a period of 24 years, it also retrospectively salutes the great soul and reggae music from bygone eras – from the 50s right through to the mid 70s. For me, 1975 was a very special year for a variety of reasons. 1) My baby sister was born ; 2) I left school (YAY!) ; 3) I went nuts about reggae music. These three things were pivotal events in my life. Reggae music pretty much took over my very being that year – it was like a drug and I was seriously hooked. I read everything I could about it in magazines, newspapers, fanzines. I spent all my spare time in reggae record shops. I bought as much as I could afford. I picked up mainly UK releases but also started to buy pre-release Jamaican imports. I avidly listened to Capital Radio’s TV On Reggae radio show every Saturday night. Tommy Vance even read a request out for me! Even through ’76 and ’77 I was still tracking down tunes I’d heard and wanted in ’75. I created my very first Wants List. Trust me, it was extensive! Of course, I wasn’t to realise at the time how fortunate I was to get switched on to reggae music when it was coming into its golden era. As for the kind of reggae music that appealed to me at the time – Continue reading

The Top 25 Reggae Singles of 1977

Part of the focus of Celebrate Good Times will be on supplying an overview of each year in a section dedicated entirely to Annual Analysis. This has various strands including a chronological yearly retrospective on subjects including trends, music styles, innovations, outstanding gigs, news stories and obituaries. In addition, there will also be a listing of Top 25s of the year in relation to reggae and soul albums and singles. Using a specially devised inverted points system, these listings of the Top 25 records of the year will provide a snapshot of the most successful records of the year – which are not always the No.1 tunes. Any records which overlap two years are listed in the year with most weeks on the chart – or, if that is equal, the year of its highest chart position. There were 189 new entries on to the reggae singles chart during 1977 – using the unique points system, here are the Top 25 of the year. Highest chart positions are in brackets. 1. Man In Me | Matumbi | Matumbi Music Corp. (1) 838 points In 1976 this British reggae band had attained tremendous success with their chart-topping proto-lovers rock single ‘After Tonight’. This follow-up was issued on their own label at the tail end of ’76 and entered the UK Reggae 20 on January 1st at No.10. It was a Bob Dylan song originally recorded by him and included on his 1970 album ‘New Morning’ – but had been covered by Continue reading