1977 – UK Soul Number Ones

The first issue of Black Echoes in 1977 was dated January 1st. In the Soul Singles chart, KC & The Sunshine Band were knocked off their Christmas top-spot by a group who had already had a few hits on the chart, including a No.1. The year saw a good mixture of bands, soloists, vocal groups and instrumentalists all make their way to the top of the chart. The chart-toppers were dominated by American acts – but a British band and a trio of French disco experimentalists broke through. Unusually, all the weeks at No.1 by all of the acts were consecutive. There were 22 records in all. Spin ’em: CAR WASH | Rose Royce | MCA 7 wks As a precursor to my personal insight on this particular single, please see the 2nd blog – 1976 Soul Number Ones. It gives you the initial lowdown on this essential disco cut. Suffice to say, this was the first No.1 soul single of ’77 and what a scorcher! Topping the charts for an impressive 7 weeks, it was the title-track to a comedy film starring Richard Pryor. Producer Norman Whitfield created the soundtrack which strongly featured the group. With its distinctive opening handclaps, the song (sung with soulful energy by lead vocalist Gwen Dickey) captured the imagination of everyone – topping the US pop charts along the way and reaching the Top 10 in the UK. This was the group’s second UK Soul Singles No.1 hit. DON’T LEAVE ME THIS WAY | Continue reading

1995 – UK Reggae Number Ones

As recorded in the very first blog, back in 1976 there were 19 records that topped the chart during the initial year of the UK Reggae 20. For the first few years of the reggae charts, most of the singles averaged one or two weeks at the top, with only a select few having a longer run. This meant that there were sometimes as many as 24 records hitting the top-spot (1979). By the mid-80s, the trend had reversed and fewer records were reaching No.1 but for much longer periods. In 1995 only ten records reached the top! The tunes are a mixture of lovers rock, bashment, ragga and roots. These are the hits – mostly, massive hits! As always, an asterisk signifies non-consecutive weeks at the top spot. PERFECT LADY | Peter Hunningale | Fashion 2 wks Peter Hunningale first topped the reggae charts in 1989 on his combination tune with Tippa Irie called Ragamuffin Girl. Dubbed Mr. Honey Vibes, his sweet singing style has firmly established him as one of the kingpin UK lovers rock vocalists. Perfect Lady is a slice of lovers rock perfection. I love the intro – the bleeps from Diana Ross & The Supremes’ Reflections is overlapped by Prince Jazzbo intoning “Sound to keep you movin’” before the ridim drops (Pretty Looks) and the song begins. This tune remains a true party classic. Most definitely one for the ravers. BABY PLEASE | Peter Hunningale | Saxon 1 wk From one ravers classic to another, Continue reading

1994 – UK Soul & Dance Number One Albums

The soul albums chart kicked off 1994 with Snoop Doggy Dogg’s Doggystyle clinging to the No.1 slot for a further two weeks into January – making a total of six weeks at the peak for the canine rapper. The following is a reminder of what came afterwards – with the exclusion of any album re-entering the No.1 slot from the previous year. The albums were mainly R&B and hip-hop but also included the odd house/dance album, a jungle compilation and a couple of UK offerings. As always, non-consecutive weeks are listed with an asterisk. These are the number one soul albums of 1994. Roll ‘em. DIARY OF A MAD BAND | Jodeci | MCA 4 wks Jodeci first came to prominence in 1991 with their debut album Forever My Lady. Comprising two pairs of brothers (known as K-Ci and JoJo/DeVante Swing and Mr. Dalvin) they made a huge impact on the soul scene in the US and UK with New Jack Swing tracks like Gotta Love, My Phone and their take on The Association’s 1966 smash Cherish. But their forté proved to be superslow slow-jams like Stay, the title-track and I’m Still Waiting. This LP continued the format – the first side containing ballads, the other more uptempo swingtings. Five singles were released from the album – slow-jam burners like What About Us, Cry For You, My Heart Belongs To U and the exquisite Feenin’.  Their track included in the movie Who’s The Man was big in the UK NJS clubs Continue reading

1976 – UK Reggae Number One Albums

The first UK Reggae LPs chart appeared in Black Echoes on February 14th 1976. During the year, 114 albums made the charts – which, from the very beginning, included reggae albums imported from Jamaica or the United States. Of those 114 albums, 10 were by DJ artists, 20 were by bands and vocal groups, 27 were by male vocalists – with only 1 by a female vocalist. The rest were dub albums and compilations. More albums reached No.1 by DJ artists than any other – but the biggest album of the year – by a long chalk – was by a group. Big albums of the year that didn’t reach the No.1 slot include Legalize It by Peter Tosh (No.2), Life Of Contradiction by Joe Higgs (No.4), On The Rock by The Cimarons (No.2), Kick Boy Face by Prince Jazzbo (No.4), Chalis Blaze by Jah Woosh (also No.4) Man In The Hills by Burning Spear (No. 3), Columbia Colly by Jah Lion (also No.3), Trenchtown Mix-Up by The Gladiators (No.4), Satta Massagana by The Abbysinians (No.2). Night Food by The Heptones (also No.2) and 2000 Volts Of Holt by John Holt (No.3). Big-selling dub albums included Gun Court Dub, Rass Claat Dub, African Dub Chapter 2, King Tubby Surrounded By The Dreads At The National Arena and Rasta Dub ’76. Apart from the special No.1 sampler listed below, the other big compilation of the year was Strictly Rockers In A Dread Land. Just 13 albums managed to reach the highly Continue reading

1987 – UK Soul & Dance Number One Albums

This is the first look back to an era which saw the influence and development of electronic music within soul and dance. Out went the large orchestrations, the jazzier arrangements and the percussive frills – in came the drum machines, the computerized keyboards and the birth of hip-hop. Yes – it’s the Eighties. The following is a blow-by-blow account of all the Number One soul albums of 1987. Gone were all the vocal groups and bands – in were the soloists, mainly men. As usual, an asterisk indicates non-consecutive weeks at the top, a cross signifies an imported album not at the time released in the UK. It doesn’t include albums re-entering the No.1 position from 1986. UPFRONT 4 | Various artists | Serious 1 wk The ‘Upfront’ series had been launched in 1986 on Serious and showcased in-demand imports, current dance releases and popular mixes. This fourth edition combined the usual mix of house, hip-hop, club classics and UK vibes. Outstanding tracks included a remix of Loose Ends’ Nights Of Pleasure, Ray, Goodman & Brown’s Take It To The Limit,  the huge House Nation by The Housemaster Boyz and an early DJ Eddie F production – Mr. Big Stuff by Heavy D & The Boyz.  The inclusion of Projection’s UK classic Lovestruck  and the Darlene Davis biggie I Found Lovin’ only added to the appeal – a decent compilation for anyone who didn’t have the singles. ROCK THE HOUSE | DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince | Champion Continue reading

1976 – UK Soul & Dance Number One Albums

When Black Echoes was first published on January 30th 1976, it didn’t have an albums sales chart for reggae and soul. The first reggae album chart was published within a couple of weeks of the newspaper’s launch – but the first soul album chart didn’t appear until some three months later. In all, 13 albums topped the album charts – mainly consisting of male artists and groups. No female topped the chart in ’76 and only one compilation made it to the top. Here is a rundown of all of the Number One soul albums of 1976. An asterisk indicates non-consecutive weeks at the top. I WANT YOU | Marvin Gaye | Tamla Motown 1 wk Prior to this long-player, Marvin had not released a solo studio album since 1973’s Let’s Get It On. In the interim, Marvin Gaye Live! had been issued in 1974 but nothing had been heard of him since. Released in the States on Tamla in March 1976, this album was a very welcome return of the great one for MPG fans like myself. The title-track was released as a single and was an instant smash. The only other 45 taken from the album was After The Dance. The LP is basically a collection of Leon Ware songs, mostly written with Diana Ross’ brother T-Boy Ross. Leon also produced and arranged the album. Although not as successful as his previous couple of studio albums, it was still a phenomenal seller. Consisting of mainly mid-tempo grooves, Marvin Continue reading

The Top 25 Reggae Singles of 1977

Part of the focus of Celebrate Good Times will be on supplying an overview of each year in a section dedicated entirely to Annual Analysis. This has various strands including a chronological yearly retrospective on subjects including trends, music styles, innovations, outstanding gigs, news stories and obituaries. In addition, there will also be a listing of Top 25s of the year in relation to reggae and soul albums and singles. Using a specially devised inverted points system, these listings of the Top 25 records of the year will provide a snapshot of the most successful records of the year – which are not always the No.1 tunes. Any records which overlap two years are listed in the year with most weeks on the chart – or, if that is equal, the year of its highest chart position. There were 189 new entries on to the reggae singles chart during 1977 – using the unique points system, here are the Top 25 of the year. Highest chart positions are in brackets. 1. Man In Me | Matumbi | Matumbi Music Corp. (1) 838 points In 1976 this British reggae band had attained tremendous success with their chart-topping proto-lovers rock single ‘After Tonight’. This follow-up was issued on their own label at the tail end of ’76 and entered the UK Reggae 20 on January 1st at No.10. It was a Bob Dylan song originally recorded by him and included on his 1970 album ‘New Morning’ – but had been covered by Continue reading